Moving House

I have decided to move this website to WordPress. This may seem like no big deal, but it actually means a significant change to how I am approaching and using this site/blog.
My intention for the 2017 incarnation of my website was to use it as a tool for learning html and CSS by coding the site by hand. In some ways I did partly achieve this goal – I have learned a lot. However, I also found that I wanted to use the site as an ongoing repository and record of my writing, plus to find a way to syndicate it with social media feeds as I move away from using Facebook, Instagram or Twitter as the place I post thoughts and instead write first on my own site. I have an inherent distrust of companies that make their money off the data gleaned from the users of their services, and I hate all the advertising that I’m barraged with on the big social media channels.

Recently I stumbled across the ‘IndieWeb‘ folks who embrace a similar ideal of pushing for an open web as opposed to the ‘walled gardens’ of Facebook, Twitter, and other social media companies. Many of the people behind this movement are programmers who code their own solutions to enable interaction with other on the open web and I’m certainly not in that sort of league. But they have also created tools to make life easier for average bloggers like myself, tools such as WordPress themes and plugins – stuff that I am able to implement (if I use WordPress to drive my site).

Discovering these plugins and themes added additional weight to a problem I was facing in having a completely static website; how to notify people of new articles posted on my site. The typical mechanisms to do this are via RSS feeds or email lists, both of which are tricky (as in not possible for me) to implement using html and CSS, the only development tools I have mastered enough to do anything useful with. I did try using a flat-file CMS called Grav last week, but after a lot of fiddling to move my files across to it found that it is still not straightforward to use as a non-programmer.

Another factor in favour of WordPress is that having used it for many years now it takes hardly any thought for me to maintain a blog with it and I really want to put more focus into actual writing and creating content, not spending most of my efforts in trying to get my site simply functional. The articles I had on my static version of the site were mostly ones I had written in the past and I found that there was some good stuff in amongst the trivia I have written over the years. This is the big advantage of cultivating a discipline of regular writing – if I write a lot there will end up being something good produced occasionally. I want to get back to this.

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