Near miss

I have worked in labs for a long time and it is generally a pretty safe work environment despite what some folks imagine. However, occasionally something happens that has the potential to turn pear-shaped.

Today I was making some 5 molar sodium hydroxide solution, which is corrosive. In fact, 1 molar sodium hydroxide is corrosive, 5 molar is five times stronger and so is very corrosive. It was also hot because the solution heats up as the solid dissolves. Without giving it too much thought, I covered the top of the measuring cylinder I was using and inverted it to mix. Unfortunately the combination of heat and alkaline solution dissolved part of the seal on the lid, resulting in a spurt of liquid bursting out and across my bench. Fortunately it went away from my face and didn’t hit anybody else so was mostly just a mess and some on my hand which was easily washed off.

In hindsight there were a few things I did wrong there: Inverting a measuring cylinder is a quick and dirty way to mix solutions but always has the potential for spills – I was taught better than that but have become slack over the years. It also was luck rather than good planning that caused the splash to go away from my face. I was wearing eye protection but probably should also have had a face shield on. Sodium hydroxide in the eyes is one of the worst accidents that can occur in a lab and the only reliable way to avoid it is to have protection between you and the corrosive liquid.

As with most mishaps I’ve had in labs over the years I was not injured, just got a fright. Whether that means I’m a safe worker or just stupid but lucky I’m not sure! It is good though to be reminded of the need to be careful and aware that something could potentially go wrong at any time.

What could have happened! (sodium hydroxide dermal burn)

Image of burn from: BMJ Case Rep. 2012; 2012: bcr2012007103. Published online 2012 September 11. doi:  10.1136/bcr-2012-007103

Poems I have read in 2018

Poems that I have read in 2018

  1. Ogre by Emma Neale (Spark).
  2. Spell by Emma Neale (Spark).
  3. Lucky dip by Emma Neale (Spark).
  4. Renewal by Emma Neale (Spark).
  5. Going to sleep by Emma Neale (Spark).
  6. Ride to Banburry Cross by Emma Neale (Spark).
  7. Mirror by Emma Neale (Spark).
  8. The science fair by Emma Neale (Spark).
  9. The first stone by Emma Neale (Spark).
  10. Chronoslide by Emma Neale (Spark).
  11. Abecedarian by Emma Neale (Spark).
  12. The early life of Marc Chagall by Emma Neale (Spark).
  13. Yellow Opus by Emma Neale (Spark).
  14. Night feeds by Emma Neale (Spark).
  15. Exposure by Emma Neale (Spark).
  16. Skin by Emma Neale (Spark).
  17. Mansfield Park by Emma Neale (Spark).
  18. Kid gloves by Emma Neale (Spark).
  19. The Annihilation of Matter by William Bronk (Selected Poems).
  20. Blue Spruces in Pairs, a Bird Bath Between by William Bronk (Selected Poems).
  21. We want the Mark of Time by William Bronk (Selected Poems).
  22. At Tikal by William Bronk (Selected Poems).
  23. In deed by Emma Neale (Spark).
  24. Open home by Emma Neale (Spark).
  25. Divorce by Emma Neale (Spark).
  26. Buzz track by Emma Neale (Spark).
  27. Loving a mountaineer by Emma Neale (Spark).
  28. Traveller overdue by Emma Neale (Spark).
  29. Metonymy as an Approach to a Real World by William Bronk (Selected Poems).
  30. Anderson’s Bay by Emma Neale (Spark).
  31. Whakatane by Emma Neale (Spark).
  32. Reversal by Emma Neale (Spark).
  33. Lyric by Emma Neale (Spark).
  34. Cropped by Emma Neale (Spark).
  35. Ecology: A future history by Emma Neale (Spark).
  36. Truth as a Far Country; as a Piteous Ogre by William Bronk (Selected Poems).
  37. Embarrassment of riches by Emma Neale (Spark).
  38. Mend by Emma Neale (Spark).
  39. In the swim by Emma Neale (Spark).
  40. Warm spell by Emma Neale (Spark).
  41. Water colours by Emma Neale (Spark).

Book learning

As I’ve been reading and researching information about writing for the web, I realised that it will save me time to find a book on the topic by someone who already knows about it. After a bit of indecision and largely based on reviews on Amazon, I have chosen the book Writing for the Web by Crawford Kilian.

The author of this book spent 40 years teaching at community colleges and from what I’ve read so far appears to know what he is on about. In fact, just reading the introduction I learned a new concept for me, the difference between hypotaxis and parataxis, and the idea that hypertext relies more on parataxis in which ideas stand alone without being linked to the previous idea.

I’m wanting to learn without my existing biases getting in the way so it makes sense to carefully read through this book (and possibly others), putting what I learn into practise and also following through with further reading and research where I can.

More information about hypotaxis and parataxis:

Writing for the Web

A couple of weeks ago I mentioned wanting to learn how to write better and the idea of a self-directed writing course. I hadn’t forgotten and have been piecing together ideas on what I would want in such a course. I have decided that a good starting place is the subject of ‘writing for the web’. This site could no doubt benefit from better writing and it provides a base to build upon. At the bottom of this post I’m also listing some things I will not be covering in my exploration of this subject.

Writing for the Web

Goal: To understand what is unique about writing for readers of the internet and how to best communicate through written web content.

My approach to this ‘course of study’ will be to research each topic and produce a blog post with what I learn. I may try to tackle some sort of special project in order to apply what I learn also, but I don’t currently know the form this would take.

Topics:

This is a preliminary list of topics that I want to at least touch upon over the next fifteen weeks or so. As I write posts about topics I will link to them here. The list is sure to grow and change as I learn, and I may not tackle topics in the order listed.

How is web writing different?

The Writer

  • Credibility

The Audience

  • Engaging your audience
  • What do they want?

Writing

  • Content structure
    • the inverted pyramid
    • Frame
    • Plan
  • Creative nonfiction
  • Finding a story
  • Characters
  • Guiding the reader
  • Influencing readers
  • Keeping it brief
  • Metaphor
  • Point of view
  • Reconstruction of events
  • Reflection
  • Scenes
  • Subjectivity
  • Truth
  • Use of imagination
  • Headlines
  • Voice
  • Interviewing
  • Is there a ‘perfect’ blog post?
  • Editorial planning
  • Writing well is thinking well

Storytelling

  • What is story?
  • Why is storytelling important?
  • What can story do that facts can’t?
  • How to use storytelling

Research

  • What sort of research is necessary?
  • Pulling research together into a story
  • Where to start?

Ethics

  • Fact or fiction
  • Fact-checking
  • Avoiding plagiarism
  • Acknowledgment of sources
  • Defamation and libel
  • Compression

What I will not cover:

  • Content forms that are primarily audio or visual such as podcasts and videos. I will consider how visual elements affect written web content.
  • How to increase traffic
  • SEO
  • Making money
  • Website design

Reading on the web

This is part of a series on Writing for the Web.

The famous answer by Jakob Nielson to “How do users read on the web?” is “They don’t.”

Very few web users read written web content word-for-word. Instead, they scan the page searching for the information they want.

However, I question this finding. The eye tracking study which showed people scanning for information on the page was conducted in such a way that participants were given the task of looking for specific information on the page. When a person is searching for something in particular they will scan written text looking for it, whether it is written on a screen, paper or the side of a building. But there are still plenty of people who like to read in order to learn, for entertainment or because it is enjoyable. These are the people I want to write for.

Reading behaviour for long articles

To me, a more interesting question is, how do people read an article on the internet when they are interested in what it has to say? Are there differences in how we read a 1,000 word magazine style article on a website compared to how we read it in a newspaper?

Farhad Manjoo wrote an article on Slate which looks at roughly this question. He asked a data scientist to analyse the scrolling behaviour on Slate articles to determine what proportion of users scroll all the way through their articles. Taking a very broad view it seems that only something like 10 to 20% of users scroll all the way to the bottom of an article. These figures do have some correlation with actual reading in that better quality articles tend to end up with a better proportion of people scrolling all the way to the end to see what is there.

Reading online takes longer

It takes people approximately 20-30% longer to read online than it takes to read on paper. (The effects of reading speed and reading patterns on the understanding of text read from screen. Mary Clare Dyson & Mark Haselgrove Journal of Research in Reading 23(2):210 – 223 · June 2000)

Multitasking is more likely online

In a study comparing on-screen and hard copy reading, 90% of students stated that they are more likely to multitask when reading from a screen. (Redefining reading: The impact of digital communication media. NS Baron – PMLA, 2013)

Reading from a screen is harder

Naomi Baron found that people consistently said it is harder to concentrate when reading from a screen, and that it is easier to focus when reading hard copy.

Physicality of books helps reading

Baron noted that in her studies there were significant preferences for the physical attributes of books, preferences which can inform how web writing could be made easier to read. These physical aspects of books include the ease of navigation and knowing where one is reading and how it relates to the overall text, the book cover and it’s visual imprint on memory, being able to easily annotate a book, and the ease of flipping from place to place in a paper book.

Short and scannable is not the only option

Despite the commonly held view that web readers prefer short, scannable content, there is evidence of an audience hungry for longer articles that engage and inform them. In fact, Jacqueline Marino found that even if an article is very text heavy, it can still be engaging if it is well structured and well written. Similarly, Chris Giliberti argues that Millennials are seeking out high quality long form content to counter the constant stream of short, shallow web content which has become the norm.

Challenges to web writing

From what I’ve discovered about how people read online, here are some of the challenges for a web writer:

  • Readers switch from linear reading to searching or skimming.
  • Reading online is slower.
  • Distraction is a problem for web readers.
  • Web readers often multitask.
  • Web writing needs to be well written and well structured.
  • Readers typically expect shorter content online.
  • It is assumed that reading should include instant access to other resources.
  • Help readers navigate through the text.
  • Visual markers are useful to readers.
  • Ease of annotation may help readers.

My current notebook

This is a bit of a geeky post. I thought I would start keeping tabs on the notebooks and writing sticks I use. I already have reasonably strong preferences in what I like to write on and with, but over time it could be interesting to see what I actually use most as opposed to what I think I like to use. My guess is that non-aesthetic factors such as price and availability could play a bigger role than I presently account for.

The notebook currently in my back pocket is from Story Supply Co. It is one from a pack of three that I ordered from the US in 2016 when I was placing an order for a few other items. I’ve already used one of them and found it a good notebook with nice paper for pencil (hence the pencil in the photo).

Pocket Staple Notebook by Story Supply Co.

The pencil I’m using is a General’s Cedar Pointe HB (or #2 for Americans). It actually seems a bit soft for an HB but is an OK pencil. I like the natural wood finish and the eraser on the end is handy when carrying it around in my pocket. Because the point wears down reasonably quickly (and I prefer a sharp point), I often also have a small brass bullet sharpener in my pocket too. The plastic pencil cap is by Tombow and keeps the lead point from snapping off while doubling as a pencil extender by sticking it on the eraser end when I’m using the pencil. Another centimetre or so and I will retire this pencil to use in my bullet pencil.

Note: These notebook posts won’t be particularly frequent as I take a while to get through each notebook (from 3 months to almost a year in some cases).

Related Posts:

Link

On Editing Harshly

I came across an interesting little post about how to write (and edit) a blog post which is fairly realistic about how the process really happens. I’m not quite as rigorous on the editing now that I’m trying to put something out each day.

Randomly think of a thing. Let it bump around your head a bit. If the bumping gets too loud, start writing the words with the nearest writing device. See how far you get. The more words usually mean a higher degree of personal interest. Stop when it suits you.

How to Write a Blog Post by Michael Lopp (Rands)