New (old) notebook day

I have just reached the last page of my previous notebook so rather than crack open a brand spanking new one I’m returning to one that I started using about a year ago but for some reason abandoned in my locker at work. This is a Moleskine ‘cahier’ lined pocket notebook, they are readily available and this format is an ideal pocket size.

I waver between using lined, unlined and dot grid notebooks. Unlined obviously offers the most flexibility, but I typically write short notes rather than drawing stuff and my writing is small enough to comfortably fit within most lines and grid layouts. In the end my main reason for choosing a particular layout is often just wanting a change from whatever I was previously using.

Another factor which can be important to me is the type of paper in a notebook. If I’m in the mood to be using a fountain pen I opt for Clairefontaine notebooks which are also great value for money. Pencil works well on most paper (but not well on the Clairefontaine coated paper!), with the Story Supply Co. paper being particularly good. Moleskine has mediocre quality paper, it is awful for fountain pens, OK for pencil and OK for ballpoint and gel pens.

Because of the middling quality of the Moleskine paper, and mainly because I haven’t been using it much lately, I’m pairing up this notebook with my favourite ballpoint pen. This is a Lamy 2000 multi pen, actually the most expensive pen I own but excellent for carrying around in my pocket. I’ve replaced the Lamy D1 refills with Zebra JSB 0.5 refills in royal blue, black, carmine red and emerald green. The ink in these flows immediately and is nice and smooth to write with. They are not very economical refills because of their small size but for the way I use the pen it is an ideal set up – four colour options, no skipping or false starts and no problems with accidental leaks in my jeans pocket.

 

Another idiosyncrasy of my notebook is that I taped a ‘pencil board’ (shitajiki) inside the front cover to stiffen it a little. This particular one was designed for a larger notebook so has been trimmed a little to fit. It does make writing notes while on the move a bit easier, I forgot I had done this so am glad to have found this notebook again.

My current notebook

This is a bit of a geeky post. I thought I would start keeping tabs on the notebooks and writing sticks I use. I already have reasonably strong preferences in what I like to write on and with, but over time it could be interesting to see what I actually use most as opposed to what I think I like to use. My guess is that non-aesthetic factors such as price and availability could play a bigger role than I presently account for.

The notebook currently in my back pocket is from Story Supply Co. It is one from a pack of three that I ordered from the US in 2016 when I was placing an order for a few other items. I’ve already used one of them and found it a good notebook with nice paper for pencil (hence the pencil in the photo).

story-supply-notebook
Pocket Staple Notebook by Story Supply Co.

The pencil I’m using is a General’s Cedar Pointe HB (or #2 for Americans). It actually seems a bit soft for an HB but is an OK pencil. I like the natural wood finish and the eraser on the end is handy when carrying it around in my pocket. Because the point wears down reasonably quickly (and I prefer a sharp point), I often also have a small brass bullet sharpener in my pocket too. The plastic pencil cap is by Tombow and keeps the lead point from snapping off while doubling as a pencil extender by sticking it on the eraser end when I’m using the pencil. Another centimetre or so and I will retire this pencil to use in my bullet pencil.

ssc-pencil

Note: These notebook posts won’t be particularly frequent as I take a while to get through each notebook (from 3 months to almost a year in some cases).

Related Posts:

Current notebook

This is the notebook I have been carrying around for most of this year. It is by Clairefontaine, made in France. With high quality paper for fountain pen use it has been a really good notebook to use, the paper is smooth and takes ink well without smudging. Initially I was worried that it might take too long for ink to dry for quick notes, but I find that by the time I’ve written something and capped my pen the ink is dry so have had no issues. There are 48 sheets of paper in this book (i.e., 96 pages) so it lasts a long time – hence the beaten up appearance of this notebook. I bought this notebook from the University Bookshop in Dunedin for less than $5.

clairefontaine-preppy

The pen is a Platinum Preppy extra fine nib. For a cheap plastic fountain pen I think these are fantastic value and really nice to write with. You can buy these in NZ for just under $10 which makes them excellent for carrying around because even if it were to get dropped and broken or lost the loss is not catastrophic. I’ve had this particular pen for two years now and often carry it around in my pocket. There have been no leaks, it always starts well without skipping, and writes nicely. I’m cheap and refill the empty cartridges from a bottle of ink, so it’s economical writing.


Related posts:

Pencils

I have an odd obsession; pencils.

Don’t laugh, I’m serious, there is even a podcast that exclusively discusses pencils.

Obviously I’ve used bog standard pencils for years, generally without giving them much thought aside from noting which ones pissed me off when the leads broke in sharpeners, the wood split or they were gritty and scratchy when writing. Since finishing school my use of pencils diminished in favour of pens, especially as my use of handwriting moved from the presentation of finished work to being used for writing rough drafts that would end up typed into a computer.

With the superior presentation facilitated by computers and laser printers, handwriting for me has become something that generally only I see and a thinking tool for getting ideas onto paper away from screens and gadgets. These days my handwriting no longer needs to be neat or free from cross-outs, meaning that pen is as convenient as any other writing tool. Pens don’t need to be sharpened and the tips don’t break as do pencil leads.

However, with my change of occupation back to being a lab technician after over ten years in office environments, I’m finding pencils are more versatile, being easier to manipulate with gloves on and quicker to use for brief notes. Pencils work instantly and write on surfaces that ballpoint pens don’t, such as damp or frozen labels, thermal paper, and electrophoresis strips. Obviously pencils are also erasable and in my job we often use paper checklists and need to erase the previous set of check marks so pencil is the only option there. Somehow the simplicity and disposability of a wooden pencil seems more appropriate in an environment where we have concerns and regulations about chemical and biological contamination.

Beyond the lab I am enjoying using pencils again for general note taking and writing tasks such as drafting blog posts. I prefer to write my drafts by hand and with pen the result is a lot of cross outs as I correct my spelling or think of a better way to phrase something. With pencil I can rub out the mistakes and end up with a cleaner draft that is easier to follow as I type it into WordPress.

A major contributor to my new enjoyment in using pencils is the discovery of better quality pencils. I used to think that pencils came in two categories, those that were OK and the crappy ones with spilt wood and fragile, scratchy leads. Through listening to Tim, Johnny and Andy on the Erasable Podcast I learned about the iconic Palomino Blackwing 602 so ordered a couple online and was amazed at how nice they are to write with compared to the Staedtler Tradition pencils I’m accustomed to using. There is a real difference between el cheapo pencils and quality pencils.

My next step down the rabbit hole of pencil geekery was to order an assortment of pencils from what may be the only retail shop in the world that specialises in pencils and related accessories, CW Pencil Enterprise. I’m still in the process of trying those out so will reserve judgement until I’ve used them enough to determine which are my favourites.

(I wrote this over a year ago but never published it until now. At least this enables me to say confidently that my all round favourite pencil is the Swiss Wood, it is smooth to write with and holds its point really well. The main drawback is the price at about NZ$7 each by the time you get it shipped from the UK or US.)


Some interesting links: