Bible reading times

How long does it take to read each book of the Bible? I found the graphic which prompted this post on the blog of Jeff Medders. There are also some fancier versions with the same numbers, an Old Testament one, and a New Testament version. As I was digging around the web researching this post I discovered that the source of the reading times appears to be the Desiring God article Three Tips for Better Bible Reading.

I also found another list with slightly different numbers here (if you click that link it will download the document).

What I have done is to combine the numbers to give a range of time to read each book, which I think is more realistic because we don’t all read at the same speed. Also, I suspect the Desiring God numbers may be a bit optimistic. For some books such as 1 & 2 Samuel, Desiring God only have one number for reading both books so I had to do a bit of an estimate to get the range. In these cases the time for reading both books as claimed by Desiring God is also listed.

I also found a list of the Flesch-Kincaid Reading Grade Level (lower is easier to read) for each book in the ESV (Crossway). The grade level is effectively equivalent to the expected reading level after that many years of school. This is more about how easy or difficult it is to parse each sentence rather than whether the passage is easy to understand. Also note that the algorithm chokes on poetry because it is weighted to assume short sentences are easier to read (hence the book of Job is rated as easy to read!)

  • Genesis: 3 hrs 30 min – 4 hrs 35 min.
    (50 chapters, 32,046 words) Reading level 6.3
  • Exodus: 3 hours – 3 hrs 37 min.
    (40 chapters, 25,957 words) Reading level 7.3
  • Leviticus: 2 hours – 2 hrs 35 min.
    (27 chapters, 18,852 words) Reading level 8.7
  • Numbers: 3 hours – 3 hrs 35 min.
    (36 chapters, 25,048 words) Reading level 8.5
  • Deuteronomy: 2 hrs 30 min – 3 hrs 8 min.
    (34 chapters, 23,008 words) Reading level 8.7
  • Joshua: 1 hr 45 min – 2 hrs 8 min.
    (24 chapters, 15,671 words) Reading level 9.4
  • Judges: 1 hr 45 min – 2 hrs 5 min.
    (21 chapters, 15,385 words) Reading level 7.4
  • Ruth: 15 – 20 minutes.
    (4 chapters, 2,039 words) Reading level 6.3
  • 1 Samuel: 2 hrs 15 min – 2 hrs 45 min.
    (31 chapters, 20,837 words) Reading level 6.4
  • 2 Samuel: 1 hr 45 min – 2 hrs 18 min.
    (24 chapters, 17,170 words) Reading level 6.7
  • 1 & 2 Samuel: 4 hours
  • 1 Kings: 2 hrs 8 min – 2 hrs 47 min.
    (22 chapters, 20,361 words) Reading level 7.8
  • 2 Kings: 2 hrs 8 min – 2 hrs 40 min.
    (25 chapters, 18,784 words) Reading level 7.8
  • 1 & 2 Kings: 4.25 hours
  • 1 Chronicles: 2 hrs 15 min – 2 hrs 56 min
    (29 chapters, 16,664 words) Reading level 8.7
  • 2 Chronicles: 2 hrs 15 min – 3 hrs 2 min
    (36 chapters, 21,349 words) Reading level 9.3
  • 1 & 2 Chronicles: 4.5 hours
  • Ezra: 40 – 58 minutes
    (10 chapters, 5,605 words) Reading level 9.8
  • Nehemiah: 1 hour – 1 hr 20 min
    (13 chapters, 8,507 words) Reading level 8.9
  • Esther: 30 – 40 minutes
    (10 chapters, 4,932 words) Reading level 9.8
  • Job: 1 hr 45 min – 2 hrs 49 min
    (42 chapters, 12,674 words) Reading level 4.2
  • Psalms: 5 hours – 7 hrs 38 min
    (150 chapters, 30,147 words) Reading level 3.9
  • Proverbs: 1 hr 45 min – 2 hrs 45 min
    (31 chapters, 9,921 words) Reading level 5.3
  • Ecclesiastes: 30 – 48 minutes
    (12 chapters, 4,537 words) Reading level 6.0
  • Song of Songs: 20 – 32 minutes
    (8 chapters, 2,020 words) Reading level 4.9
  • Isaiah: 3 hrs 45 min – 5 hrs 47 min
    (66 chapters, 25,608 words) Reading level 5.5
  • Jeremiah: 4 hours – 5 hrs 36 min
    (52 chapters, 33,002 words) Reading level 7.5
  • Lamentations: 20 – 36 minutes
    (5 chapters, 2,324 words) Reading level 4.0
  • Ezekiel: 3 hrs 45 min – 4 hrs 25 min
    (48 chapters, 29,918 words) Reading level 7.1
  • Daniel: 1 hr 15 min – 1 hr 20 min
    (12 chapters, 9,001 words) Reading level 8.5
  • Hosea: 30 – 51 minutes
    (14 chapters, 3,615 words) Reading level 4.9
  • Joel: 12 – 22 minutes
    (3 chapters, 1,447 words) Reading level 5.6
  • Amos: 25 – 43 minutes
    (9 chapters, 3,027 words) Reading level 5.3
  • Obadiah: 4 – 7 minutes
    (1 chapter, 440 words) Reading level 6.1
  • Jonah: 8 – 11 minutes
    (4 chapters, 1082 words) Reading level 6.2
  • Micah: 20 – 33 minutes
    (7 chapters, 2,118 words) Reading level 5.6
  • Nahum: 8 – 14 minutes
    (3 chapters, 855 words) Reading level 3.8
  • Habakkuk: 9 – 16 minutes
    (3 chapters, 1,011 words) Reading level 4.3
  • Zephaniah: 10 –17 minutes
    (3 chapters, 1,141 words) Reading level 5.2
  • Haggai: 7 – 9 minutes
    (2 chapters, 926 words) Reading level 5.9
  • Zechariah: 40 – 47 minutes
    (14 chapters, 4,855 words) Reading level 6.9
  • Malachi: 11 – 15 minutes
    (4 chapters, 1,320 words) Reading level 6.3
  • Matthew: 2 hrs 30 min – 2 hrs 55 min
    (28 chapters, 18,346 words) Reading level 6.6
  • Mark: 1 hr 30 min – 1 hr 55 min
    (16 chapters, 11,304 words) Reading level 6.1
  • Luke: 2 hrs 30 min – 3 hrs 10 min
    (24 chapters, 19,482 words) Reading level 6.5
  • John: 2 hours – 2 hrs 20 min
    (21 chapters, 15,635 words) Reading level 5.6
  • Acts: 2 hrs 15 min – 2 hrs 55 min
    (28 chapters, 18,450 words) Reading level 8.3
  • Romans: 1 hour – 1 hr 18 min
    (16 chapters, 7,111 words) Reading level 7.1
  • 1 Corinthians: 1 hour – 1 hr 10 min
    (16 chapters, 6,830 words) Reading level 6.3
  • 2 Corinthians: 38 – 40 minutes
    (13 chapters, 4,477 words) Reading level 7.6
  • Galatians: 20 – 25 minutes
    (6 chapters, 2.230 words) Reading level 7.8
  • Ephesians: 20 – 25 minutes
    (6 chapters, 2,422 words) Reading level 11.7
  • Philippians: 14 – 18 minutes
    (4 chapters, 1,629 words) Reading level 9.0
  • Colossians: 13 – 18 minutes
    (4 chapters, 1,582 words) Reading level 9.0
  • 1 Thessalonians: 12 – 15 minutes
    (5 chapters, 1,481 words) Reading level 8.5
  • 2 Thessalonians: 7 – 10 minutes
    (3 chapters, 823 words) Reading level 8.8
  • 1 Timothy: 16 – 20 minutes
    (6 chapters, 1,591 words) Reading level 9.7
  • 2 Timothy: 11 – 15 minutes
    (4 chapters, 1,238 words) Reading level 9.1
  • Titus: 7 – 10 minutes
    (3 chapters, 659 words) Reading level 9.7
  • Philemon: 3 – 5 minutes
    (1 chapter, 335 words) Reading level 8.8
  • Hebrews: 45 – 60 minutes
    (13 chapters, 4,95 words) Reading level 9.5
  • James: 16 – 20 minutes
    (5 chapters, 1,742 words) Reading level 6.4
  • 1 Peter: 16 – 22 minutes
    (5 chapters, 1,684 words) Reading level 8.8
  • 2 Peter: 10 – 12 minutes
    (3 chapters, 1,099 words) Reading level 10.2
  • 1 John: 16 – 20 minutes
    (5 chapters, 2,141 words) Reading level 6.1
  • 2 John: 2 – 3 minutes
    (1 chapter, 245 words) Reading level 7.2
  • 3 John: 2 – 3 minutes
    (1 chapter, 219 words) Reading level 5.6
  • Jude: 4 – 6 minutes
    (1 chapter, 461 words) Reading level 8.5
  • Revelation: 1 hr 15 min – 1 hr 40 min
    (22 chapters, 9,851 words) Reading level 8.4

12 June 2018 update:

Over the last couple of months I’ve been reading the King James Version of the Bible and realised that another factor that will have an impact on how long it takes to read the Bible is the translation you use. This probably is a reasonably consistent factor across all books of the Bible though so I guess that for some translations like the KJV you could just assume it will always take a bit longer to read than for others such as the NIV.

Devotional reading in the digital age

I was sent a link to this article: Devotional Reading in the Digital Age today by my friend Chris.

I could anticipate the likely conclusion of the author before I began reading, but was pleased to see a subtitle ‘Let’s not be luddites‘ towards the end of the piece. Overall, the argument is that a smartphone is designed for communication and makes this so easy to do that remaining undistracted while using one to read a digital bible is quite difficult when compared to reading a paper version.

Personally, I do find this to be the case for myself. Sometimes I purposely leave my phone in a different room to avoid the temptation to fart around on social media instead of reading the bible. However, I disagree that meditating on the word of God is better with a paper bible. What I actually find is that I meditate on God’s word when I have no bible in my hand – this is when I think about what I have read or remembered and try to understand it. I may refer back to a bible, but that is often on my phone while I am walking, so a case can be made that having the bible on a digital device that’s always with you enhances meditation.

Anyway, it is a good article and a topic worth being mindful of. There are also some interesting looking links at the bottom of the article that I will get around to reading some time.

Practical biblical advice for despair

Elijah is one of the outstanding characters of the Old Testament. His epic contest with the false prophets of Baal on Mt Carmel is the high point of his career (see 1 Kings chapter 18). But Jezebel cuts short any celebration of victory, threatening Elijah with death when she catches him. So he runs for his life. I can understand that, I’d skip the country too.

He also becomes quite bummed out by the whole situation, seeing no hope for himself or the nation.

There is plenty of speculation that Elijah was depressed at this time. I’m wary of projecting 21st century psychological ideas onto a person who lived 2,800 years ago. We only have an outline of the highlights of Elijah’s life and that’s not enough information to base a diagnosis on.

Elijah goes from outstanding courage in chapter 18 to despair in chapter 19. Despair is a bad headspace to be in and one current tool used in combating it is summed up with the acronym HALT. This stands for:

  • Hungry
  • Angry (or afraid)
  • Lonely
  • Tired

I can see all of these in Elijah.

He was hungry, so an angel provided food for him. He was afraid to he ran 200km (120 miles) to get away from Jezebel (he was probably also angry at her). He was lonely, telling God he was the only prophet left. And he was tired, sleeping under a broom tree in the desert. He was so fed up that he asked God to take his life.

The idea behind this acronym is that when we are hungry, angry, lonely, tired or any combination of the four, our actions, reactions, and choices can be coloured by how we are feeling. If I am feeling tired, angry or hungry, I am more likely to over react to irritations and inconveniences. By being aware of this I can try to address these things, making it easier to constructively cope with things I don’t have control over.

It seems that God did this for Elijah – he slept, then an angel woke him to eat some food, let him sleep some more and provided more food (1 Kings 19:5–7). Then Elijah took a long walk and was reassured that he was safe and would be given someone to take over the burden of being a prophet from him (1 Kings 19:15–17). God showed him that spectacular signs were not what he needed (1 Kings 19:12). The outworking of seemingly ordinary events under God’s control would fulfill God’s plans.

This is a good reminder to me when I am feeling down and just want a way out. The way out of my current situation is by living through it and God will answer my prayers within the bounds of the ‘ordinary’.

Sometimes when life sucks I just need to have some dinner and get an early night. Once I am fed, rested, and have connected with those I love, I’m better able to seek God.


Elijah-Daniele_da_Volterra
Related posts:

Image: The Prophet Elijah by Daniele da Volterra, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Scripture references:

Ref 1 Kings 19:1-14 Ahab told Jezebel all that Elijah had done, and how qhe had killed all the prophets with the sword. Then Jezebel sent a messenger to Elijah, saying, “So may the gods do to me and more also, if I do not make your life as the life of one of them by this time tomorrow.” Then he was afraid, and he arose and ran for his life and came to sBeersheba, which belongs to Judah, and left his servant there. But he himself went a day’s journey into the wilderness and came and sat down under a broom tree. tAnd he asked that he might die, saying, “It is enough; now, O Lord, take away my life, for I am no better than my fathers.” And he lay down and slept under a broom tree. And behold, an angel touched him and said to him, “Arise and eat.” And he looked, and behold, there was at his head a cake baked on hot stones and a jar of water. And he ate and drank and lay down again. And the angel of the Lord came again a second time and touched him and said, “Arise and eat, for the journey is too great for you.” And he arose and ate and drank, and went in the strength of that food uforty days and forty nights to vHoreb, the mount of God. The Lord Speaks to Elijah There he came to a cave and lodged in it. And behold, wthe word of the Lord came to him, and he said to him, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” He said, “I have been very xjealous for the Lord, the God of hosts. For the people of Israel have forsaken your covenant, ythrown down your altars, and killed your prophets with the sword, aand I, even I only, am left, and they seek my life, to take it away.” And he said, “Go out and stand on the mount before the Lord.” And behold, the Lord passed by, and ca great and strong wind tore the mountains and broke in pieces the rocks before the Lord, but the Lord was not in the wind. And after the wind dan earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake. And after the earthquake a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire the sound of a low whisper. And when Elijah heard it, ehe wrapped his face in his cloak and went out and stood at the entrance of the cave. And behold, fthere came a voice to him and said, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” He said, “I have been very jealous for the Lord, the God of hosts. For the people of Israel have forsaken your covenant, thrown down your altars, and killed your prophets with the sword, and I, even I only, am left, and they seek my life, to take it away.” (ESV)

Bloodbath

A wise person once told me that in bringing up his children he allowed them to read whatever they wanted to but resolved to also read the same books and discuss the meaning of the ideas presented by the authors.

So I am currently reading “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins as my 11-year-old daughter is also reading it. The story is gripping and moves fast enough to draw me in. However, even though there is not much gore in the descriptions of the killings, the whole thing is very bloodthirsty and is messing with my head a bit.

Then, in order to bring my mind back to reality, I dipped into by Bible reading plan – Joshua chapter 11. Have a read for yourself.

Even more bloodthirsty, and currently messing with my head a bit also!

Choose your sword wisely

I have used three different Bible translations for my ‘daily’ reading (well, ‘reading most days’!) over the years. However, in retrospect I’m not sure that it is such a wise idea to change translations – I started off reading the NIV, then after about five years changed to the NKJV because it was more literal and reading that version gave some passages much more force than the NIV which appeared to have ‘softened’ the impact. About four years ago I changed again and now read the ESV. This change was partly because this translation comes highly recommended and also because I like the flow of the language – contemporary English with good grammatical structure, not ‘dumbed down’, and a literal translation rather than a paraphrase.
Each of these translations has been used by God to nurture my faith in Jesus. I’m glad to be reading the ESV, but the problem with having changed translations is that I still ‘think in NIV’. When I know there is a passage in the Bible about something I almost invariably remember the NIV version of the text rather than the ESV or NKJV, which makes searching for it online tricky because generally I search for the ESV text because that’s what I currently use.

The great irony of having accurate online search tools for the Bible is that I often can’t find what I’m after there – I have to pull out my old NIV exhaustive concordance from the bookshelf and flip pages until I find the passage I remembered, then look it up in my ESV. Maybe it is a sign of old age that I can find Bible information quicker in a paper book than electronically!

The point of all this? Don’t switch translations without having a VERY good reason to do so, it is good to be able to ‘think Bible’ in the same translation as you read every day (or most days). In the end the important thing is to be reading the Bible rather than analyzing it academically.

Another good reason to stick with one bible is the tendency to remember not only the words but also the position of those words on the page. It sounds silly, but this is does make it much easier to find the verse that convicted you last week. One obvious disadvantage of eReaders I suppose!

Pray for your kids – bible

I will delight in your statutes; I will not forget your word.
Deal bountifully with your servant,
that I may live and keep your word.
Open my eyes, that I may behold
wondrous things out of your law.
(Psalm 119:16-18 ESV)

The Bible feels like my lifeline as a Christian. It is. I pray for my kids that they also will understand this and first learn to read it, then grow in comprehension of the depth of meaning it holds.

My experience as a new Christian (I was born again when 18 years old) was that God gave me a fervent hunger to read the Bible. This clearly comes from the Holy Spirit so I also pray for my children that God will give them this gift – an avid hunger for His word.

“‘Man shall not live by bread alone,
but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”

(Matthew 4:4 ESV)

Download the prayer prompts:

31 Days of Prayer; Children

Bastard of a wayward woman

Andy Naselli discusses The Importance of Dignified Translations of the Bible.

Personally I prefer the coarser, more literal renderings that pack a punch. This is where occasionally reading a different translation or paraphrase can open my eyes to the meaning of verses I have read often but missed the real impact of.

(For the more polite version of what Saul said, click here)

Bastard of a wayward woman


Andy Naselli discusses The Importance of Dignified Translations of the Bible.

Personally I prefer the coarser, more literal renderings that pack a punch. This is where occasionally reading a different translation or paraphrase can open my eyes to the meaning of verses I have read often but missed the real impact of.

(For the more polite version of what Saul said, click here)

Interpreting the times

Let all the house of Israel therefore know for certain that God has made him both Lord and Christ, this Jesus whom you crucified.”Now when they heard this they were cut to the heart, and said to Peter and the rest of the apostles, “Brothers, what shall we do?” (Acts 2:36-37 ESV)

It is rare nowadays to find anyone able to proclaim the correct Biblical interpretation of current events.

Peter does so magnificently in Acts 2:22-41, and given his track record I would argue that it is spending 40 days in fellowship with the risen Son of God and in prayer that gave him the background understanding to be able to do this.

It is good to know what is going on in the world but without an ongoing, deep fellowship with Jesus through the Bible and prayer it will all lead me to emptiness and despair.